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CAPPA


Adaptive Reuse Study
Navy Supply Corps School, Athens, GA
Prepared in collaboration with
University Architects for Facilities Planning
January 17, 2007

Click here to download/view the pdf (3.64 mb)


CAPPA, a Community Approach to Planning Prince Avenue, was formed as a vehicle to gather information about the users and uses of Prince Avenue - what works and what doesn't; what it has now, had then and might have in the future - from as diverse a population of stakeholders as possible and to then present possible design solutions in a visual format to stimulate public comment and/or action. After months of data collection and public input, over 200 volunteers including design professionals, community leaders, UGA faculty, staff and students, ACC staff and ordinary folks spent hundreds of man-hours in a three-day design charrette* converting those facts, opinions and wishes into a series of visual representations.

These images were presented at a public forum held October 18, 2004 at ARMC's Medical Services Building and made available online for further input. They are organized by team as dictated by the issues facing Prince Avenue according to over 600 responses to our questionnaires. Those issues fell broadly into five categories: Landscape, Historic Resources, Diversity of Uses (Planning), Urban Design and Transportation.

The images created during the CAPPA process gave graphic expression to the public's aspirations for the future of Prince Avenue. CAPPA went to great pains to keep the process objective, refusing more than a few requests to endorse or object to proposed plans along the Prince Avenue corridor. Advocating "the right way" was not CAPPA's purpose. Rather, our purpose was to generate discussion. Thank you for taking the time to participate and keep the discussion alive.




View the Slides from the October 2004 presentation.

 

 

*Literally translated, charrette means "little cart" and invokes the deadline-driven design process 18th century architectural students faced to submit their projects on the passing cart. Today the term is used to describe the rapid, intensive process through which competing community objectives, as expressed by stakeholders through various input mechanisms, are reconciled in creative design proposals.

 

 
Contact the HBNA: HistoricBoulevardNeighborhood@gmail.com